Microsoft is working on a new feature for the Teams cooperation platform that will let users customize their appearance before joining a video call.

In an update to the product action plan, the company explains that Teams users will soon have access to multiple different video filters, giving them the ability to move face up and face down in certain aspects of its transmission.

"Before joining an assembly, you can use filters to dimly adjust lighting levels and soften facial features to customize their appearance," Microsoft wrote.

The company first announced plans to introduce video filters last summer, but is now targeting an August 2021 launch window.

The myth of the perfect office worker

The new Microsoft Teams feature is likely to be useful to a wide range of users, especially those who work in a dimly lit home office or use a poor quality webcam.

However, it can be argued that such a feature could also thwart certain advances made since the beginning of the pandemic in terms of employee hopes.

By disengaging staff from the carefully controlled office environment, the pandemic shattered the myth of the perfect office worker: someone who is always and in all circumstances serene, always and in all circumstances orderly and also unswervingly professional.

On your site, there is a new acceptance that employees often juggle many other aspects of their lives while fulfilling their job responsibilities; they may have children or pets to care for, or a family crisis to deal with.

Even before the pandemic, it was interesting that a little one interrupted a live television interview, but interludes in video conferences have become a familiar rule.

These ancillary responsibilities can prevent someone from putting on makeup before an assembly, but experience of working undercover has proven that they have little impact on your productivity and the quality of your work.

The pandemic has altered the way people relate to work, for better or worse. More by introducing a feature developed to help workers rebuild the damaging illusion of perfection, Microsoft is unconsciously fighting against one of the most positive results: a healthier perspective of the relationship between work and routine life.

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